The sea trial was pubblished in Superyacht 17 – Summer 2008

CRN is well known and much appreciated for its production of metal vessels. Thanks to considerable investment in the Ancona yard in recent years by the Ferretti Group, which owns the brand, yachts over 80 metres can now be ordered.

Side by side with this fully custom range the yard, headed by Lamberto Tacoli, also offers a line of semi-displacement vessels in composite, of which the 43 metre Emerald Star has become the new flagship.

After official presentation at the last Festival de la Plaisance in Cannes, the CRN 43, the newest composite model launched by the yard, also appeared in the States at the Miami Boat Show 2008. With her elegant and refined style, she is already mature for tackling the market and international competition in the composite displacement sector, which currently seems to attract many owners. But this CRN is also a boat aimed at a mature public, not so much in terms of age as of yachting and seagoing experience. People who have sailed many miles, maybe after years of activity in the planing hull or even the large sailboat world: they are the main admirers of the displacement hull, a typology which for many represents an actual point of arrival.

Emerald Star is almost 140 feet long and the hull is equipped with a bow bulb, a hydrodynamic solution which by modifying wave resistance obtains the same speed with less power and therefore lower fuel consumption. The yard declares that this CRN has a range of 4000 nautical miles at a cruising speed of 13 knots.
The thrust supplied by two 1.400 HP CAT engines gives a top speed of 15.5 knots. The stabilising system installed on the yacht consists of seven Anti Rolling Gyro Mitsubishi MSM-5000s.

The naval architecture is the work of the CRN technical department, in close collaboration with Studio Zuccon International Project which also handled the design and everything else to do with internal and external layout. The yacht is developed on three decks, with plenty of space indoors and out, which are all faced in teak. Setting out from the lower deck, the guests’ night area is very large: two cabins aft with central double bed and a slightly smaller one forward with the bed set obliquely. The fourth cabin has twin beds, but like the others is equipped with wardrobe and private bathroom with separate shower unit. Needless to say that the windows in all cabins, nearly two metres long, provide fine lighting as well as giving guests an evocative view.

The crew’s quarters occupy the entire forward part of the deck: four cabins with bunk beds and private bathrooms, plus a mess with dinette and galley. From this zone an access stairway leads to a service area on the main deck where the great ship’s galley is set along the port side. In steel and apparently essential, it is actually perfectly equipped to deal with parties and dinners of all kinds.

The owner’s quarters take up the whole forward area of the main deck. Accessible from the starboard side they consist of a private study and a suite with central double bed, a dressing table and a wardrobe. But the most striking thing is a small terrace on the sea, on the starboard side, as evocative as it is exclusive and furnished with armchairs and a coffee table. The bathroom is also spectacular, full-beam and with two of everything: sanitary ware, washbasins and shower units.

On the same deck, aft of the great central stairway by which owner and guests access Emerald Star’s three decks, the most formal zone of the boat consists of a dining room with a rectangular table seating 12, then the main saloon, set out in a large C-shaped living area, with a great plasma TV.

The thread running through the interior decoration reflects the intrinsic maturity that this boat suggests, also from a technical viewpoint. In fact the furnishing scheme is based on furniture that is certainly far from the minimal style so much in vogue on faster vessels. The style is much more consolidated, always elegant but definitely beyond fashions. The colours seemed to us to have been very carefully selected, the nuances of the furniture, upholstery and curtains, just as the lighting has been designed to highlight details and accessories, creating highly evocative atmospheres.

There is a second saloon on the upper deck where huge windows offer a panoramic view. Its 40 square metres overlook an outdoor dining area in the second covered cockpit with an oval table for 12, creating a single, less formally furnished environment, dedicated to the voyage and voyagers and decidedly suitable for parties and cocktails aboard.

The captain’s quarters are amidships on this deck: cabin with double bed set athwartship, private bathroom and office, with direct access to the comfortable bridge equipped with instruments, monitors, switches and various dials set out over 180° in front of the two helmsman’s seats. Everything and more for control of the course, the engines and all on-board apparatus.

For sun lovers and outdoor enthusiasts the sundeck includes a central bar area, sun-beds and a circular Jacuzzi forward. The aftermost part of the deck can be used to stow two jet-skis.

One of the singularities of this CRN in composite is certainly the gym on the lower deck, set between the garage for the tender and the stern. The latter opens up to create a directly accessible bathing platform.

For further information: CRN

by Fabio Petrone

TECHNICAL DATA
Hull/superstructure: in composite – Hull: displacement, with bow bulb – LOA: m 42.60 – Beam: m 8.65 – Full load draught: m 2.35 – Full load displacement: kg 330.000 – Sleeps: 10 (1 owner’s suite + 4 VIP cabins) – Fuel tanks: 45,000 litres – Water tanks: 7,000 litres – Engines: 2×1.044 KW at 2,300 rpm CAT C32-C – Generators: 2×100 kW at 50 Hz Kohler – Top speed (half load): 15.5 knots – Cruising speed: 13 knots – Range at cruising speed: 4,000 nautical miles – Naval architecture: CRN Technical Department – Interior and exterior design: Zuccon International Project – classification C * Hull ° MACH Ych (MCA).